Pins of the Week: Sweaters

as seen on Pinterest (thislittlenine)

as seen on Pinterest (thislittlenine)

Even though it’s 100 degrees here in Texas,  I’ve been obsessed with finding new fall fashions…particularly sweaters. It could be wishful thinking. In the retail world it’s already October, and I’m excited by what’s new and creative in sweater choices. It’s so hard to find good designs when the cold weather is actually here.

I believe dinos are the sharks of the fall. I’ve been seeing foxes everywhere, and I love the elbow pad trend. I narrowed down my favorite sweater pins here. Happy Inspiration!

(Pins can be found on our Boys Wear, Girls Wear, Robot and Dino boards)

What I’m Reading Now: The Honest Life

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One of my New Year’s resolutions this year was to use my library card more. I also up the ante by trying to read one book a week. To date, I’ve averaged about one book a month, which is better than I had been doing. Last year, I read three books total. It was my first year as a mom so finishing a magazine was a treat.

For my first ‘What I’m Reading…’ post, I chose to read Jessica Alba’s “The Honest Life”. I’m not a “green” team person by any means, but I want things that are clean and safe for my baby’s body. I started questioning things when I was nesting. Now that he eats table food and tries to lick everything he touches, it’s even more important to know what’s going in his mouth.

I don’t want to be the one who taints his body.

Watching my mom struggle with cancer this past year has me questioning more the every day chemicals and toxins we come in contact with. Are we killing our bodies and am i hurting my little guy by trying to disinfect for him?

The eco-products are safe for the environment but are the disinfecting chemicals safe for my toddler. Up to this point, I’ve been using baby wipes on his high chair, but am I leaving germs as his food choices start to grow.

In the book’s introduction, Alba states:

I eat (organic) meat.
I don’t have time to wash cloth diapers.
I have a total black thumb-if I had to grow our food, we’d starve.

That statement reeled me in. I’m not trying to be a super mom (Gwyneth). I just want to be a good mom.

If you’ve read the book, let me know what you think of it. Thanks for joining me in the conversation.

Social Media and a Parent’s Death

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Last month, I experienced the most heart-breaking moment of my life…my mom died. I was with her from her last conversation to her last breath.

A post on Bluebird Kisses prompted me to finally post about it, since the topic of social media and death has started a debate on ‘sharing’ too much.

The man behind the controversy is Scott Simon, a NPR radio personality, who started tweeting from his mother’s hospital bedside. His tweets shared intimate moments of cradling his mother, holding her hand, her heart rate dropping and when she died. Just reading the few comments below you can see the tug of war between support and criticism.

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During my mother’s last days, I wrestled with using the word “death” in a tweet or status update. I was feeling so many emotions that I felt were insensitive to share. I didn’t want to invite sympathy or distraction, so i stayed away from posting. That being said, I appreciated Simon’s posts.

Simon gave a voice to the experience that I didn’t want to share. I didn’t want to break people’s hearts by telling my story, especially those who have not lost a parent. Simon made me feel connected and calm, because I knew he shared my pain.

In the days following my mother’s death, my family found comfort in memorial Facebook posts friends and family put in their status updates. My mother didn’t want a funeral, and she chose to be cremated, so in a way, online posts served the purpose of a funeral and obituary. It never even occurred to us to place an obit in her hometown newspaper.

We filtered through family photos, and posted them onto her Facebook page for people to download as keepsakes. Having her life in pictures helped me grieve and relatives were grateful to have photos with her tagged to their profile.

In the next few months, we’ll have to cancel her email and Facebook account, but for now, it’s nice to see her face online everyday. It’s like a bit of her is still here. It’s not insulting or disgraceful to share if sharing helps you cope.

So I say, Simon, handle your grief for you, and let others have their opinions for themselves. Something about being able to share this experience makes it real. I’m glad that Simon’s sharing prompted me to post.